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Camping for Foodies: Eat Well In The Great Outdoors

March 23rd, 2015 by ironcooker

Camping for Foodies: Eat Well In The Great Outdoors

Camping provides you with an excellent opportunity to enjoy nature and also create quality memories with your family. It doesn’t matter if you’re pitching a tent in your backyard, or if you’ve decided to venture deep into the wilderness. You can enjoy good food during your adventure! With a little advanced planning it’s possible to enjoy every single meal you prepare during your camping trip.

Be Resourceful!

Be Resourceful while Cooking Camping - Cast Iron PotYou don’t need fancy cooking utensils like jet boils, fancy propane stoves, and fold up pans. These items are nice, and if you go on camping trips several times a year, they can be a sound investment, but casual, resourceful individuals find they do quite well with items they already have in their kitchen and a fire pit.

Grabbing your favorite cast iron skillet or large pot might is definitely a preferred way to go.  But if you’re still waffling on a longer-term purchase, all you need is one or two good aluminum pie pans, a pair of tongs, and a full roll of heavy duty aluminum foil. You will be able to purchase everything you need for a few dollars at a grocery store.

The variety of items you can cook on your fire pit with these tools will astound you. Whenever you want to eat anything hot, you simply wrap the food in an aluminum packet and toss it on the fire pit. In ten minutes you’ll be ready to dine. Since the foil will be hot when you remove it from the pit, you’ll want to use the tongs to unwrap your dinner.

Not only will you have hot, delicious food, but cleanup will be a breeze!

Having the pie tins makes it possible for you to fry any bacon you might have brought along, or to heat soup and chili.

A few simple tools make it possible for all foodies to enjoy great cooking while camping!

Simple is Simply Delicious!

Hamburger Brioche RollsAs a foodie, you want your cooking to net delicious results. The type of camping you’re doing and the amount of food you bring along will determine what you can make. The good news is that you’ll be able to use your campfire to make a number of simple meals which will appeal to your taste buds, and provide you with the energy needed for a full day of exploring.

A few pounds of good hamburger can go a long ways.  With the addition of some brioche rolls, a little seasoning and some butter you won’t need the condiments you use at home. When preparing the meat, take a thin pat of butter and place it in the center of each patty.  Wrap the meat in aluminum foil and place it on the fire for a few minutes. The burger will explode with flavor—and you can even toast your buns!  In the morning you can mix a little burger into some cream of mushroom soup and add a little seasoning and prepare it the same way you would make sausage gravy.

A cooking fire and your pie tin make preparing scrambled eggs easy, and they’re a great source of protein which will keep you going all day long. Add a handful of diced peppers and a pinch of your favorite savory spice blend for an extra dose of flavor.

S’mores might be the standard campfire dessert, but they’re not your only option. Take an apple. Put it and some butter, sugar, and cinnamon in a foil packet, and bake in your fire pit. It will be the tastiest apple you’ve ever eaten!

Keep an Open Mind

Keep an Open Mind Cast Iron CookingJust because you’re camping, there’s no reason you have to subside on trail mix, granola bars, and jerky.  Anyone can use a campfire and prepare some simple, delicious meals.  The types of meals you enjoy will be determined by the ingredients you bring along. When shopping look for food that you can use for a couple of meals. Don’t forget, the better the quality of your ingredients, the better you meals will taste.

In addition to cooking on the camp fire, you might also want to prepare a few meals ahead of time and bring them along.

Do you have favorite campfire recipes? Helpful tips? A campfire cooking story? Feel free to share in the comments below!

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Apple Stuffed Pork Tenderloin

March 7th, 2015 by ironcooker

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Apple Stuffed Pork Tenderloin

This is a wonderful  Dutch Oven recipe we came across,and we had to share it with you.

Made at your camp site or at home in your back yard, you are sure to enjoy this recipe as much as we have.

1 small apple, chopped (Granny Smith)
1/2-cup bread crumbs, soft
1/4 cup celery, chopped
1/4 cup green onions, chopped
2 Tablespoons raisins
2 Tablespoons walnuts, chopped
2 – 3 pound pork tenderloin, trimmed of fat
1/2 cup apple cider
1 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
Dash of nutmeg
Cooking instructions:
Stuffing:
Stir together the chopped apple, bread crumbs, celery, raisins, walnuts,
green onion, and nutmeg.
Add 1 Tablespoon of the cider. Mix well.
Meat Preparation:
1. Butterfly the tenderloin. Cover with clear wrap and pound to 1/2 inch thickness.
2. Spread stuffing mixture over meat. Roll up from one side.
3. Tie with cotton string to secure. Brush with some of the remaining apple cider.
4. Place meat on a rack in a 12″ Dutch oven.
5. Bake for approx. 45 minutes to 1 hour.
Sauce: While tenderloin is baking, combine in a sauce pan the rest of the appl
cider,
cornstarch, and cinnamon. Cook and stir till thickened and bubbly. Serve with
tenderloin.

CHARCOAL HINTS: Use 10 to 12 briquettes underneath and 12 to 14 on the lid.

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Grill Roasted Yard Bird

February 13th, 2015 by ironcooker

Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Yard Bird

By: Capt’n Salsa
Wow I have a hankering for some really good grill roasted chicken, the melt in your mouth variety with some fresh homemade salsa slathered right on top. Just seems that we never have time during the lazy days of summer to get everything done. You know, you have to mow the grass, weed the garden and if you’re lucky harvest a bounty of fresh produce from your own little truck farm.
Now you expect me to cook supper too? It’s time to tell you my secret and go hunting for my favorite “yard bird”, Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Yard Bird, to be exact.
Yes.

Camp Chef Grill
Delicious golden brown moist and tender some of the best melt in your mouth grill roasted chicken you will ever eat. Now, don’t let the hunting phrase concern you. The extent
of hunting chicken for me is looking for a big plump 3.5 to 4 pounder at the local grocery or meat market. I always bag my limit of two because it is just as easy to cook two at the same time to guarantee some leftovers…
“Come on, Capt’n Salsa, quit beating around the bushes and just give us the recipe!”
Oh, Okay.
Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Yard bird is so easy you will probably laugh. Of course it goes with out saying you need to rinse the chicken in cold water before you cook it. All you are going to need is a generous amount of Lemon Pepper Seasoning. Mix up a solution of 1 part vegetable oil with 4 parts of Apple Cider Vinegar, remember that’s the brown vinegar, together in a squirt bottle, an empty syrup bottle will do just fine.
Now we are going to cook our grilled chicken whole on your favorite charcoal or 2 burner gas grill using the “indirect heat” method. Your grill needs a lid that will close, too. Most of the time now I just use the gas grill, heating the grill with both burners, then turn one of them
totally off, yes, off and the other burner turn it all the way down to low.spg90bcc
I’m getting a little ahead of myself. Preheat your choice of grills. Then rinse and clean the birds. Now hose down the chicken with the mixture of oil and vinegar using the squirt bottle and sprinkle a generous portion of Lemon Pepper Seasoning all over the chicken. Don’t forget the body cavity.
Place the chicken breast side up on the grill away from the heat source, above the burner that is turned off, indirect heat method remember. Squirt a little more oil and vinegar into the cavity of the chicken until it “overflows.” Now close the lid. You want a low to medium low heat level. The objective is to take at least 2 to 2 1/2 hours to cook the chicken, nice and slow. Don’t worry after a couple of times you will have it “down to a science” and know what works best for you.
Once you have your chicken on the grill go mow the grass or work in your garden for the next 2 to 2 1/2 hours without even looking at the birds… well, if you insist on looking after about an hour, you can raise the lid and give the birds a good squirt of the oil and vinegar solution… Now, close that lid and get back to work.
You will know the chicken is done by grabbing the tip of one of the legs with a paper towel, careful it will be hot, and gently twist the leg bone in a circle. If the leg bone easily breaks free at the joint, the chicken is done – a beautiful golden brown, moist and tender every time.
Easy huh?
Place the chicken on the grill, mow the grass and when you are finished with your yard you have Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Chicken make that Yard Bird! Serve it up with one of your favorite homemade salsa recipes.
Roasted Corn Salsa or tasty Salsa de Tomatillos Delicious! Wrap it all up in a warm tortilla, complete with your favorite thirst quenching beverage and you will marvel about how great your yard looks.
Imagine. Mowing the grass and cooking supper all at the same time. Enjoy!

Author Bio
Capt’n Salsa provides an outstanding collection of free homemade salsa recipes at his web site, Great Salsa. Submit your favorite salsa recipe for publication at: http://www.great-salsa.com/submit_your_favorite_recipe.html

Article Source: http://www.ArticleGeek.com

Posted in Campfire Cooking | 2 Comments »

Dutch Oven Recipes: Black Forest Cobbler

February 1st, 2015 by ironcooker

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The Black Forest Cake is something of a misnomer.  In its native german, the cake goes by the name of Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte, which literally translates to Black Forest cherry torte.  And you can see by the assembly that it is as much a cake as a Boston Cream Pie is a pie.

A Black Forest Cake is constructed by layering chocolate cake, whipped cream, and cherries on top of each other.  It’s capped at the top with another round of chocolate cake, and then the whole thing is dressed down with more whipped cream and often decorated with cherries and chocolate shavings on top.  Or, at least, that’s how it’s supposed to be done.

[Fun Fact: This cake gets its name not because the cake itself came out of Germany’s Black Forest, but because it is traditionally doused with a cherry liquor that hails from the region.]

What Makes a Black Forest Cake?

While this torte certainly has an involved and illustrious background, the most important part is what you get to eat.  This is a dessert that combines iconic flavors that westerners recognize in german desserts.

Chocolate is the foundation on which this cake is built.  The entire region gets credit for mastery of refining and bringing out the richness and depth of chocolate.  It should be no surprise that the swiss and the swedes have both also adopted their own versions of this cake.  The rich, chocolate foundation is built upon by a traditionally tart cherry flavor profile.  And while chocolate comes off as earthy and heady, the dull acidity of tart cherries provides a high note that plays against chocolate’s base flavors.  And of course, the whole thing is tied together with the creamy, sweet texture of ample amounts of whipped cream.

The problem is, a Black Cherry Cake is entirely too fragile to pack out to a campsite, and way too involved to make with the tools you have.  Or it is?

The Solution: Black Forest Cobbler

The Black Forest Cobbler is a great substitute when you’re craving the rich, engaging flavors of a Black Forest Cake but you’re nowhere near a kitchen. All of the ingredients are stable and can survive your trek, so there’s no reason not to treat yourself!

Ingredients

  • 1 Package of chocolate cake mix
  • 1 Can of cherry pie filling
  • 1 Can soda pop – cherry or lemon lime
  • 1 Hershey chocolate bar

Instructions

  1. Empty pie filling into a Non Stick 9 Inch Pie Pan.
  2. Sprinkle about 3/4 of cake mix on top in an even layer.
  3. Pour half of the can of soda on top of cake mix.  Aim for even distribution.
  4. Mix the soda into the cake mix, taking care not to disturb the pie filling underneath.
  5. Break  chocolate bar into small pieces, sprinkling on top.
  6. Put four small pebbles in a Cast Iron 4 Quart Round Dutch Oven.  Place the pie tin on top of the pebbles.
  7. Cover your Dutch oven and set on a small circle of coals. Cover the lid with coals.
  8. Cook at about 350 degrees for 30-40 minutes, or until the cake looks done when cut or poked.


And that’s a way to MacGyver a crumble worthy of the Black Forest Name even when you’re in the wilderness!!

Have you tried this recipe?  How did it work for you?  Tell us about it in the comments below!

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Thanks to Dutch Oven Dude for a great way to enjoy our favorite recipes, even outside of the kitchen!

Posted in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

The Travelling skillets update

December 4th, 2014 by ironcooker

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The Travelling skillet has made another stop.

This time it is in Michigan at Joshua Clarks where it has made grilled cheese
& some great looking banana bread. I would like to share what Josh had to say about this in his own words.
The skillet did a wonderful job on this banana bread I did today. As you can see it fell right out, no mess!2
Now the skillet is heading to Kristina Dickey, where it will be cooking something different for us all to see.
If any of you have any comments please write them below here in the comments section. We would really like to hear from you.

Posted in Iron Cooker Updates | No Comments »

Campground Cooking

April 6th, 2014 by ironcooker

campground

Campground Cooking With A Dutch Oven

An Article by Nicholas Filonovich

After a full day of camping excursions, fishing, hunting, etc., is there anything better than coming back to camp with a hot meal waiting for you?
Well this is done easily with a Dutch oven. A Dutch oven is a large cast iron pot with a lid that seconds as a skillet for your breakfast eggs or bacon, and can give your outdoor experience a wonderful meal at the end of the day.

Dutch oven with feet The basic idea of cooking with a Dutch oven is slow, slow, and slow! After your morning campfire for your breakfast and coffee and you are ready to hit the trails or stream, you bury your Dutch oven in the coals with a great meal inside that will be waiting for you when you get back! But we’ll get back to that shortly!

let’s start with the basics. First off, you will need to purchase a true campfire cast iron Dutch oven. A “true” campfire Dutch oven is made of cast iron, big and heavy with sloping sides and three legs to stand on. The lid seals the pot tightly has a rim around it to hold coals and earth. The lid is also an excellent skillet when flipped over to cook your eggs and bacon in the morning. There are “modern” Dutch ovens that are made of Aluminum, though these are definitely NOT desired for camp cooking. They easily overheat and tend to warp, and when you are cooking an all day meal to come back to, the last thing you want is a pot full of coals and dirt. So after you have purchased your new cast iron Dutch oven, the first thing you need to do is to give it a very good washing in hot water and soap. This washing will prepare it for seasoning. Many manufactures coat the cast iron with wax or other sealers to preserve the appearance of the utensil. After a good cleaning it is ready for seasoning. Seasoning is when you coat your new cast iron oven with oil or grease and “cook” it in your oven or campfire for several hours. Generally a couple to four hours is fine. The more the better. This process can get smoky in your oven so make sure you have your vent on. Basically this lets the oil or grease prepare the metal for even cooking and adds that special touch to cast iron cooking. Once seasoned, you will not have to do it again, as long as you do not excessively scrub the oven. Warm water and soap will do just fine for cleaning. Never use a “Brillo” pad or harsh abrasives. All Right, back to the cooking. A Dutch oven is designed for cooking over or in an open fire. Being heavily made with very thick metal, it distributes the heat more evenly. So when it is in a campfire either covered with coals or on a hook over a direct fire, it cooks very evenly. It also works great withDutch Oven Breadcampfires as they tend to very in the amount of heat they give out due to flare-ups, burn downs, hot coals, etc. One of the best uses and one of my favorites of using a Dutch oven is burying the oven with your favorite stew in a bed of coals and earth after your morning meal. Let your meal slowly cook all daylong while you are away enjoying your day outdoors. Later in the article we have included some “recipes” for all day stews. Dutch oven cooking is like any type of outdoors cooking, i.e. grilling, smoking, or even cooking a hotdog over a campfire, it is almost an art of trial and error. There is no exact science of how long to cook, what to add, how much to spice it up. Every campfire will give different results, though a Dutch oven does compensate for many. As a general rule, as with a home Slowcooker/Crockpot, the longer the better. Long, slow cooked meals tend to be very tender and delicious. The same goes for Dutch oven meals covered with coals and earth. Tender meats, tasty vegetables and seasoning all blended after hours of cooking, what more can one ask after a long day outdoors!

Recipes:

Well, I did say that I would give recipes at the end and here is a very basic recipe for your enjoyment!

Beef Stew:

2 pounds of Stew Beef in 1-inch cubes
4/5 Carrots,
Sliced 1 Onion,
Diced 3 Potatoes,
Diced 2/3 Stalks of Celery,
Sliced 1 28 oz. Can Tomatoes
2 Bay Leaves
2 Cups Beef Broth
1 Clove Garlic, Minced
Salt and Pepper to taste

One of the great aspects of a Dutch oven is that you can combine just about anything to create a great outdoors meal. You can add any type of meat, vegetable and spice to create a wonderful dinner. Some helpful hints; -Brown whatever meat you are using by adding a little oil or grease to the oven when it is hot. Once browned, drain fat and return to heat. -Add whatever vegetables and spices you wish to the meat and cover with water. -Being that it will be simmering all day, the meal should take anywhere from 6 to 12 hours, all depending on the amount of heat, coals, wind, rain, etc.. Cooking with a Dutch oven is most definitely not an exact science, which is why I love it so much. You never know what to expect, and that is part of the enjoyment behind it. But after you come back to your campsite after a day outdoors and you smell that wonderful stew cooking, you will know another one of the great outdoor secrets!

Published at: http://www.isnare.com/

Posted in Campfire Cooking | 11 Comments »

Camping for Foodies: Eat Well In The Great Outdoors

Monday March 23rd, 2015 in Campfire Cooking, Family Camping | No Comments »

Apple Stuffed Pork Tenderloin

Saturday March 7th, 2015 in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

Grill Roasted Yard Bird

Friday February 13th, 2015 in Campfire Cooking | 2 Comments »

Dutch Oven Recipes: Black Forest Cobbler

Sunday February 1st, 2015 in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

The Travelling skillets update

Thursday December 4th, 2014 in Iron Cooker Updates | No Comments »

Campground Cooking

Sunday April 6th, 2014 in Campfire Cooking | 11 Comments »

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