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Camping for Foodies: Eat Well In The Great Outdoors

March 23rd, 2015 by ironcooker

Camping for Foodies: Eat Well In The Great Outdoors

Camping provides you with an excellent opportunity to enjoy nature and also create quality memories with your family. It doesn’t matter if you’re pitching a tent in your backyard, or if you’ve decided to venture deep into the wilderness. You can enjoy good food during your adventure! With a little advanced planning it’s possible to enjoy every single meal you prepare during your camping trip.

Be Resourceful!

Be Resourceful while Cooking Camping - Cast Iron PotYou don’t need fancy cooking utensils like jet boils, fancy propane stoves, and fold up pans. These items are nice, and if you go on camping trips several times a year, they can be a sound investment, but casual, resourceful individuals find they do quite well with items they already have in their kitchen and a fire pit.

Grabbing your favorite cast iron skillet or large pot might is definitely a preferred way to go.  But if you’re still waffling on a longer-term purchase, all you need is one or two good aluminum pie pans, a pair of tongs, and a full roll of heavy duty aluminum foil. You will be able to purchase everything you need for a few dollars at a grocery store.

The variety of items you can cook on your fire pit with these tools will astound you. Whenever you want to eat anything hot, you simply wrap the food in an aluminum packet and toss it on the fire pit. In ten minutes you’ll be ready to dine. Since the foil will be hot when you remove it from the pit, you’ll want to use the tongs to unwrap your dinner.

Not only will you have hot, delicious food, but cleanup will be a breeze!

Having the pie tins makes it possible for you to fry any bacon you might have brought along, or to heat soup and chili.

A few simple tools make it possible for all foodies to enjoy great cooking while camping!

Simple is Simply Delicious!

Hamburger Brioche RollsAs a foodie, you want your cooking to net delicious results. The type of camping you’re doing and the amount of food you bring along will determine what you can make. The good news is that you’ll be able to use your campfire to make a number of simple meals which will appeal to your taste buds, and provide you with the energy needed for a full day of exploring.

A few pounds of good hamburger can go a long ways.  With the addition of some brioche rolls, a little seasoning and some butter you won’t need the condiments you use at home. When preparing the meat, take a thin pat of butter and place it in the center of each patty.  Wrap the meat in aluminum foil and place it on the fire for a few minutes. The burger will explode with flavor—and you can even toast your buns!  In the morning you can mix a little burger into some cream of mushroom soup and add a little seasoning and prepare it the same way you would make sausage gravy.

A cooking fire and your pie tin make preparing scrambled eggs easy, and they’re a great source of protein which will keep you going all day long. Add a handful of diced peppers and a pinch of your favorite savory spice blend for an extra dose of flavor.

S’mores might be the standard campfire dessert, but they’re not your only option. Take an apple. Put it and some butter, sugar, and cinnamon in a foil packet, and bake in your fire pit. It will be the tastiest apple you’ve ever eaten!

Keep an Open Mind

Keep an Open Mind Cast Iron CookingJust because you’re camping, there’s no reason you have to subside on trail mix, granola bars, and jerky.  Anyone can use a campfire and prepare some simple, delicious meals.  The types of meals you enjoy will be determined by the ingredients you bring along. When shopping look for food that you can use for a couple of meals. Don’t forget, the better the quality of your ingredients, the better you meals will taste.

In addition to cooking on the camp fire, you might also want to prepare a few meals ahead of time and bring them along.

Do you have favorite campfire recipes? Helpful tips? A campfire cooking story? Feel free to share in the comments below!

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Posted in Campfire Cooking, Family Camping | No Comments »

Grill Roasted Yard Bird

February 13th, 2015 by ironcooker

Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Yard Bird

By: Capt’n Salsa
Wow I have a hankering for some really good grill roasted chicken, the melt in your mouth variety with some fresh homemade salsa slathered right on top. Just seems that we never have time during the lazy days of summer to get everything done. You know, you have to mow the grass, weed the garden and if you’re lucky harvest a bounty of fresh produce from your own little truck farm.
Now you expect me to cook supper too? It’s time to tell you my secret and go hunting for my favorite “yard bird”, Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Yard Bird, to be exact.
Yes.

Camp Chef Grill
Delicious golden brown moist and tender some of the best melt in your mouth grill roasted chicken you will ever eat. Now, don’t let the hunting phrase concern you. The extent
of hunting chicken for me is looking for a big plump 3.5 to 4 pounder at the local grocery or meat market. I always bag my limit of two because it is just as easy to cook two at the same time to guarantee some leftovers…
“Come on, Capt’n Salsa, quit beating around the bushes and just give us the recipe!”
Oh, Okay.
Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Yard bird is so easy you will probably laugh. Of course it goes with out saying you need to rinse the chicken in cold water before you cook it. All you are going to need is a generous amount of Lemon Pepper Seasoning. Mix up a solution of 1 part vegetable oil with 4 parts of Apple Cider Vinegar, remember that’s the brown vinegar, together in a squirt bottle, an empty syrup bottle will do just fine.
Now we are going to cook our grilled chicken whole on your favorite charcoal or 2 burner gas grill using the “indirect heat” method. Your grill needs a lid that will close, too. Most of the time now I just use the gas grill, heating the grill with both burners, then turn one of them
totally off, yes, off and the other burner turn it all the way down to low.spg90bcc
I’m getting a little ahead of myself. Preheat your choice of grills. Then rinse and clean the birds. Now hose down the chicken with the mixture of oil and vinegar using the squirt bottle and sprinkle a generous portion of Lemon Pepper Seasoning all over the chicken. Don’t forget the body cavity.
Place the chicken breast side up on the grill away from the heat source, above the burner that is turned off, indirect heat method remember. Squirt a little more oil and vinegar into the cavity of the chicken until it “overflows.” Now close the lid. You want a low to medium low heat level. The objective is to take at least 2 to 2 1/2 hours to cook the chicken, nice and slow. Don’t worry after a couple of times you will have it “down to a science” and know what works best for you.
Once you have your chicken on the grill go mow the grass or work in your garden for the next 2 to 2 1/2 hours without even looking at the birds… well, if you insist on looking after about an hour, you can raise the lid and give the birds a good squirt of the oil and vinegar solution… Now, close that lid and get back to work.
You will know the chicken is done by grabbing the tip of one of the legs with a paper towel, careful it will be hot, and gently twist the leg bone in a circle. If the leg bone easily breaks free at the joint, the chicken is done – a beautiful golden brown, moist and tender every time.
Easy huh?
Place the chicken on the grill, mow the grass and when you are finished with your yard you have Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Chicken make that Yard Bird! Serve it up with one of your favorite homemade salsa recipes.
Roasted Corn Salsa or tasty Salsa de Tomatillos Delicious! Wrap it all up in a warm tortilla, complete with your favorite thirst quenching beverage and you will marvel about how great your yard looks.
Imagine. Mowing the grass and cooking supper all at the same time. Enjoy!

Author Bio
Capt’n Salsa provides an outstanding collection of free homemade salsa recipes at his web site, Great Salsa. Submit your favorite salsa recipe for publication at: http://www.great-salsa.com/submit_your_favorite_recipe.html

Article Source: http://www.ArticleGeek.com

Posted in Campfire Cooking | 2 Comments »

Dutch Oven Cooking

December 7th, 2014 by ironcooker

Dutch oven on tripod

Dutch Oven Cooking

Many cooks have one or another Dutch Oven or kettle that they like more than others
Chicken soup in camp chef cc10 dutch ovenMy personal favorite is something that I would have to make a choice over several items, and choose what was being cooked in it.
There is many styles and shapes to choose from that depends on what you are doing with it.
Some people prefer black cast iron and others like enamel coated with its many different colors to choose from.unnamed (4)
A lot people think theirs is the best style or brand there is, and are first in line to tell you that yours is not as good as what they have.
Do not believe a word of it, because if you had a good time at your camp site or preparing a meal for your family that is what counts.
You can find new cast iron Dutch ovens at several locations or watch flea markets & auctions for used items.
I personally use both. I collect old cast Iron and use a lot of newer items too.
When you are shopping for a Dutch oven ask yourself what am I going to be doing with it.

1) Am I going to hang it from a tripod
2) Will I be using it in my oven
3) Am I going to be using it with charcoal or cooking on stove top.
4) what size do I need
5) Do I want enamel coated or black cast iron

Most of this is personal preference, The main thing is to have fun using your new Dutch oven.
We hope to hear from every one of you and see pictures of your cooking experiences.

Posted in Campfire Cooking | No Comments »

Campground Cooking

April 6th, 2014 by ironcooker

campground

Campground Cooking With A Dutch Oven

An Article by Nicholas Filonovich

After a full day of camping excursions, fishing, hunting, etc., is there anything better than coming back to camp with a hot meal waiting for you?
Well this is done easily with a Dutch oven. A Dutch oven is a large cast iron pot with a lid that seconds as a skillet for your breakfast eggs or bacon, and can give your outdoor experience a wonderful meal at the end of the day.

Dutch oven with feet The basic idea of cooking with a Dutch oven is slow, slow, and slow! After your morning campfire for your breakfast and coffee and you are ready to hit the trails or stream, you bury your Dutch oven in the coals with a great meal inside that will be waiting for you when you get back! But we’ll get back to that shortly!

let’s start with the basics. First off, you will need to purchase a true campfire cast iron Dutch oven. A “true” campfire Dutch oven is made of cast iron, big and heavy with sloping sides and three legs to stand on. The lid seals the pot tightly has a rim around it to hold coals and earth. The lid is also an excellent skillet when flipped over to cook your eggs and bacon in the morning. There are “modern” Dutch ovens that are made of Aluminum, though these are definitely NOT desired for camp cooking. They easily overheat and tend to warp, and when you are cooking an all day meal to come back to, the last thing you want is a pot full of coals and dirt. So after you have purchased your new cast iron Dutch oven, the first thing you need to do is to give it a very good washing in hot water and soap. This washing will prepare it for seasoning. Many manufactures coat the cast iron with wax or other sealers to preserve the appearance of the utensil. After a good cleaning it is ready for seasoning. Seasoning is when you coat your new cast iron oven with oil or grease and “cook” it in your oven or campfire for several hours. Generally a couple to four hours is fine. The more the better. This process can get smoky in your oven so make sure you have your vent on. Basically this lets the oil or grease prepare the metal for even cooking and adds that special touch to cast iron cooking. Once seasoned, you will not have to do it again, as long as you do not excessively scrub the oven. Warm water and soap will do just fine for cleaning. Never use a “Brillo” pad or harsh abrasives. All Right, back to the cooking. A Dutch oven is designed for cooking over or in an open fire. Being heavily made with very thick metal, it distributes the heat more evenly. So when it is in a campfire either covered with coals or on a hook over a direct fire, it cooks very evenly. It also works great withDutch Oven Breadcampfires as they tend to very in the amount of heat they give out due to flare-ups, burn downs, hot coals, etc. One of the best uses and one of my favorites of using a Dutch oven is burying the oven with your favorite stew in a bed of coals and earth after your morning meal. Let your meal slowly cook all daylong while you are away enjoying your day outdoors. Later in the article we have included some “recipes” for all day stews. Dutch oven cooking is like any type of outdoors cooking, i.e. grilling, smoking, or even cooking a hotdog over a campfire, it is almost an art of trial and error. There is no exact science of how long to cook, what to add, how much to spice it up. Every campfire will give different results, though a Dutch oven does compensate for many. As a general rule, as with a home Slowcooker/Crockpot, the longer the better. Long, slow cooked meals tend to be very tender and delicious. The same goes for Dutch oven meals covered with coals and earth. Tender meats, tasty vegetables and seasoning all blended after hours of cooking, what more can one ask after a long day outdoors!

Recipes:

Well, I did say that I would give recipes at the end and here is a very basic recipe for your enjoyment!

Beef Stew:

2 pounds of Stew Beef in 1-inch cubes
4/5 Carrots,
Sliced 1 Onion,
Diced 3 Potatoes,
Diced 2/3 Stalks of Celery,
Sliced 1 28 oz. Can Tomatoes
2 Bay Leaves
2 Cups Beef Broth
1 Clove Garlic, Minced
Salt and Pepper to taste

One of the great aspects of a Dutch oven is that you can combine just about anything to create a great outdoors meal. You can add any type of meat, vegetable and spice to create a wonderful dinner. Some helpful hints; -Brown whatever meat you are using by adding a little oil or grease to the oven when it is hot. Once browned, drain fat and return to heat. -Add whatever vegetables and spices you wish to the meat and cover with water. -Being that it will be simmering all day, the meal should take anywhere from 6 to 12 hours, all depending on the amount of heat, coals, wind, rain, etc.. Cooking with a Dutch oven is most definitely not an exact science, which is why I love it so much. You never know what to expect, and that is part of the enjoyment behind it. But after you come back to your campsite after a day outdoors and you smell that wonderful stew cooking, you will know another one of the great outdoor secrets!

Published at: http://www.isnare.com/

Posted in Campfire Cooking | 11 Comments »

Campfire Cooking Made Easy

April 2nd, 2014 by ironcooker

Campfire Cooking Made Easy
Maybe you’re new to campfire cooking.  Maybe you’ve cooked on a campfire, but not for a long time– say, since your last boy scout/girl scout adventure. Part of the fun of real camping is eating something that you’ve made, not ordered.  Cooking edible meals on a campfire should be simple, fun, and something anyone can do.  Here’s what you need to know if you’re going to cook outside.

Learn to Build a Good Fire

Learn How To Make A Fire

You want a fire that keeps on going, turning into hot white coals as it burns.  That means taking the time to construct your fire, and not just throw a bunch of kindling together. If you just pile wood on a fire, it will get too hot and burn the surface of your food while the inside is left raw and uncooked.  And that’s not good campfire cooking!

Tools of the Trade

Tools of The Trade - Types of CookingYou can use several techniques to prepare your food over a campfire.

  • Open flame cooking:This is good for your basic camping meal.  Hot dogs, s’mores, and toast to name a few.  If you can spear your food with a skewer, cooking fork, or long stick and hold it over the flames, you can cook form a camp fire.
  • Campfire grill: Inexpensive and versatile, campfire grills get set up directly over coals and used like a backyard grill.  Wrap up potatoes in foil, pierce meat and veggies on to kabobs, throw on a whole ear of corn, or even boil your pot of coffee in the morning.  Just make certain your coals are warmed up for a consistent temperature.
  • Dutch oven: This is by far the easiest, safest, and most versatile way to cook when camping.  A good dutch oven is invaluable.  You can cook stew, soup, pizza, casserole, even pie in a dutch oven.  The best part of a dutch oven is the fact that you put your food in the pot, place the pot in the coals, and leave it.  Your perfect camping buddy.

What is on the menu?

What’s on the Menu?

Of course, you’ve got to plan ahead to know what ingredients and equipment you’re going to pack out.  Just remember that perishable foods may need to be kept refrigerated or in a cooler.  Plan your meals around what needs to be kept cool the longest and use those items first.

  • With Children: If you have kids on the trip, plan for 3 main meals with snacks.  Breakfast might be eggs, bacon, or pancakes, all of which are easy to make with a dutch oven, a cast iron skillet, or over a campfire grill.  Lunch can be simple, like sandwiches or hotdogs with fruit.  Dinner can be more adventurous and easy, like hobo stew (which is anything from a can in a pot with cooked meat) and s’mores for dessert.
  • Solo Plus: If you are by yourself or with your spouse, this is where you can come up with some true campfire meals. Cooking the fish you just caught for any meal is the most rewarding.  Pair this with some foil wrapped potatoes and onions and you’ve got a mouth-watering dinner with little to no refrigeration needed.
  • In Groups: If you are going with a group of people you can pass around the chef’s hat.  Seeing who comes up with what based on the ingredients at your disposal can be really fun!  But a big pot of franks and beans with cornbread muffins is often enough to make a big group happy.  End the meal with foil cooked apples and brown sugar, and you’ll be a hero to your friends.

You Can’t Avoid The Grunt Work

Once all the cooking is done, kitchen detail comes next.  Clean up is even more important at the campsite than it is at home.  Make sure that the fire is contained and put out before you leave.  Collect all of the food, cooking tools, and trash and secure them so you don’t attract animals.
Cooking over a campfire can be a great experience and a lot of fun.  Do you have any tips for campfire cooking?  Any favorite recipes? Let us know in the comments section!

Posted in Campfire Cooking, Family Camping | 16 Comments »

Making The Perfect Grilled Chicken

March 18th, 2014 by ironcooker

 

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How to Make a Perfect Grilled Chicken

by: Angelica Florin

Grilling can be a fun, family activity during weekends. Spend your lazy afternoons in your backyard, and take out those grillers for a grilled chicken for your dinner.

Sweet and Sticky Grilled Chicken WingsLearning how to grill is not as hard as you would see on television. All you need is the proper temperature for your griller especially if you are using an electric grill. Nevertheless, if you have the conventional griller, try to find some dried wood or charcoal. Ignite the coals or wood by placing crumpled papers below each coal and then set the papers on fire. Do not pour gasoline on the coals or dried wood. The smoke coming from the coals will give a gasoline-like aroma to your grilled meat. These are your best weapons in grilling.

Choose the best part of the chicken. I usually use chicken thighs and legs since they are the fattiest parts of the chicken. These parts will yield a juicy, barbecued chicken. Although these may sound unhealthy, the taste is incredibly delicious. Some would still prefer grilling chicken breasts with the skins on.

Before you start grilling your chicken, do not forget to marinate them at least overnight. Yes, overnight. This is because the longer you marinade your meat, the better absorption of flavors happens. I prefer to use store-bought marinades as these save much preparation time in the kitchen. The downside of most ready-made marinades is their high sodium content. But if you have time, you can make your own marinade from scratch. In the recipe below, the marinade and the chicken were simmered together to speed up the process of grilling and also to let the flavors marry together. I like Asian-style marinades such as this:

For every kilo of chicken:

1 cup light soy sauce (available in the Asian section of grocery stores)

2-3 tablespoons of freshly squeezed lemon or lime juice

4 tablespoons brown sugar

1 medium stalk of lemon grass (pounded)

3 cloves crushed garlic

1 teaspoon sesame oil (optional)

Combine all the above ingredients in a heavy skillet and let it boil for two minutes. Add in the chicken and simmer for another five minutes. Drain the chicken in a colander and reserve the marinade for basting during grilling. Basting is necessary so that the chicken won’t dry out. The marinade can also be made as a sauce by making a basic roux. This is simply done by placing a tablespoon of butter on a non-stick pan and let it cook for minutes. Pour over the marinade and whisk until the sauce thickens. Taste the sauce and adjust the seasoning’s accordingly. Tamarind-Grilled-Chicken

You can also opt to make a dry, rub marinade. This dry rub is comprised of herbs and spices and a little oil. For chicken, dried or fresh tarragon and rosemary blends together very well. If you want a spicier, grilled chicken, add a pinch of chilli powder and cayenne pepper. There are limitless marinades for grilled chicken. A little imagination and creativity are the keys. Make sure that when grilling the chicken, never let the flame flare up. This will result in burnt chicken. This does not appeal both to the eyes and to the palate. If this occurs, sprinkle a little water over the flame. Some also like their grillers to be covered during the grilling process.

Personally, I liked mine uncovered. There is just something about the smoke which is, for me, the essence of grilling. Grilled foods are best served warm, right off the grill with some salads or other vegetables of your choice.

 

Article Source:
http://www.articlecity.com/articles/food_and_drink/article_3677.shtml

 

 

 

Posted in Campfire Cooking | 32 Comments »

Camping for Foodies: Eat Well In The Great Outdoors

Monday March 23rd, 2015 in Campfire Cooking, Family Camping | No Comments »

Grill Roasted Yard Bird

Friday February 13th, 2015 in Campfire Cooking | 2 Comments »

Dutch Oven Cooking

Sunday December 7th, 2014 in Campfire Cooking | No Comments »

Campground Cooking

Sunday April 6th, 2014 in Campfire Cooking | 11 Comments »

Campfire Cooking Made Easy

Wednesday April 2nd, 2014 in Campfire Cooking, Family Camping | 16 Comments »

Making The Perfect Grilled Chicken

Tuesday March 18th, 2014 in Campfire Cooking | 32 Comments »

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