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Archive for February, 2015

Guide to buying a boat

February 28th, 2015 by ironcooker

Guide to buying a boat

By: Patrick Altoft

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABuying a second-hand boat has its pitfalls. To help you protect your legal rights and be aware of some of the common issues Noble Marine have produced this guide to buying a boat.
Please note that we have only addressed the legal aspects of the subject and advise that you should also satisfy yourself that the boat is seaworthy before you consider buying.

Looking for a boat?
The Noble Marine boats for sale database has over 3000 boats for sale. Each boat has a desciption and photos of the boat so you can look around before you contact the seller.

Wondering what boat to buy?
In addition to this boat and dinghy buyers guide you may wish to make use of our dinghy database or interactive boat finder where you can compare statistics of over 300 classes and view suggestions on similar classes to the type you are interested in.

Unlike a car there isn’t a legal registration document tracking the ownership, in fact unless you want to take your boat abroad, you are not required to register your boat at all and many people don’t, so checking that the person selling the boat actually owns the boat and that there are no outstanding loans secured on the boat can be difficult.

Before you consider buying a boat you should visit www.stolenboats.org.uk to see if the boat for sale, or a similar one, has been reported stolen. If a boat is not listed on the site it doesn’t mean that it is not stolen.

If you buy privately, you won’t be protected legally if the craft has a hidden history or faults. It’s up to you to ask the right questions and to satisfy yourself that the boat is in good condition before you buy.

Buying a used boat is essentially a case of ‘Buyer Beware’. The onus is on you to make sure the craft is sound, it’s a good idea to get an qualified marine surveyor or boat builder to give the craft a thorough inspection.

When viewing a boat you should satisfy yourself that the vendor is knowledgeable about the boat and has a legitimate reason for the sale. Ask yourself whether the price is similar to other boats on the market – if a deal looks too good to be true it probably is. You should always arrange to view the boat at the seller’s home address and never in a car park or other public location.

It is important to check whether the boat has been involved in any accidents or has any large repairs carried out. Most repairs will be guaranteed for 12 months so it is worth finding out the date of the repair and the repairers details in case of any future problems.

Once you are satisfied that the seller is genuine and have agreed an acceptable price you will need to arrange to make payment for the boat. This is usually carried out by bankers draft or a cash payment can be made. Occasionally the seller may be happy to accept another method of payment but you should be willing to use whichever method they suggest.

The only legal terms that cover a private sale contract are:

  • the seller must have the right to sell the craft
  • the craft should not be misrepresented
  • it should match its description

When the sale is complete you should always draw up a buyers contract so that each party can sign and keep a copy. This will act as your purchase receipt and will prove that you are the new owner of the boat. img_4438f-port-hadlock-wa-nwswbb-tlc-fsb-sea-trials-off-port-hadlock

Noble Marine have prepared a sample buyers contract for use in private boat sales. It is always important to keep the purchase receipt and the previous owners details – you may need to prove ownership or contact the previous seller in the future.

If the vessel was home built or if you are considering buying outside the EEA, you will also need to be aware of the Recreational Craft Directive requirements.

The VAT status of a second hand yacht is also important, as your vessel needs to have VAT paid status to be allowed free transit throughout the EU.

Useful Links:
www.stolenboats.org.uk
www.noblemarine.co.uk/boatsforsale.php3
www.noblemarine.co.uk/dinghydatabase.php3
www.noblemarine.co.uk/boatfinder.php3
www.noblemarine.co.uk/buyingaboat.php3?section=contract

Author Bio
Patrick Altoft is an insurance expert with Noble Marine – a specialist insurance broker providing boat insurance for most types of pleasure craft. Policies and claims are dealt with in-house, by knowledgeable staff, giving unequalled levels of service.

Article Source: http://www.ArticleGeek.com – Free Website Content

Posted in Hunting & Fishing Life | 1 Comment »

Grill Roasted Yard Bird

February 13th, 2015 by ironcooker

Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Yard Bird

By: Capt’n Salsa
Wow I have a hankering for some really good grill roasted chicken, the melt in your mouth variety with some fresh homemade salsa slathered right on top. Just seems that we never have time during the lazy days of summer to get everything done. You know, you have to mow the grass, weed the garden and if you’re lucky harvest a bounty of fresh produce from your own little truck farm.
Now you expect me to cook supper too? It’s time to tell you my secret and go hunting for my favorite “yard bird”, Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Yard Bird, to be exact.
Yes.

Camp Chef Grill
Delicious golden brown moist and tender some of the best melt in your mouth grill roasted chicken you will ever eat. Now, don’t let the hunting phrase concern you. The extent
of hunting chicken for me is looking for a big plump 3.5 to 4 pounder at the local grocery or meat market. I always bag my limit of two because it is just as easy to cook two at the same time to guarantee some leftovers…
“Come on, Capt’n Salsa, quit beating around the bushes and just give us the recipe!”
Oh, Okay.
Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Yard bird is so easy you will probably laugh. Of course it goes with out saying you need to rinse the chicken in cold water before you cook it. All you are going to need is a generous amount of Lemon Pepper Seasoning. Mix up a solution of 1 part vegetable oil with 4 parts of Apple Cider Vinegar, remember that’s the brown vinegar, together in a squirt bottle, an empty syrup bottle will do just fine.
Now we are going to cook our grilled chicken whole on your favorite charcoal or 2 burner gas grill using the “indirect heat” method. Your grill needs a lid that will close, too. Most of the time now I just use the gas grill, heating the grill with both burners, then turn one of them
totally off, yes, off and the other burner turn it all the way down to low.spg90bcc
I’m getting a little ahead of myself. Preheat your choice of grills. Then rinse and clean the birds. Now hose down the chicken with the mixture of oil and vinegar using the squirt bottle and sprinkle a generous portion of Lemon Pepper Seasoning all over the chicken. Don’t forget the body cavity.
Place the chicken breast side up on the grill away from the heat source, above the burner that is turned off, indirect heat method remember. Squirt a little more oil and vinegar into the cavity of the chicken until it “overflows.” Now close the lid. You want a low to medium low heat level. The objective is to take at least 2 to 2 1/2 hours to cook the chicken, nice and slow. Don’t worry after a couple of times you will have it “down to a science” and know what works best for you.
Once you have your chicken on the grill go mow the grass or work in your garden for the next 2 to 2 1/2 hours without even looking at the birds… well, if you insist on looking after about an hour, you can raise the lid and give the birds a good squirt of the oil and vinegar solution… Now, close that lid and get back to work.
You will know the chicken is done by grabbing the tip of one of the legs with a paper towel, careful it will be hot, and gently twist the leg bone in a circle. If the leg bone easily breaks free at the joint, the chicken is done – a beautiful golden brown, moist and tender every time.
Easy huh?
Place the chicken on the grill, mow the grass and when you are finished with your yard you have Capt’n Salsa’s Grill Roasted Chicken make that Yard Bird! Serve it up with one of your favorite homemade salsa recipes.
Roasted Corn Salsa or tasty Salsa de Tomatillos Delicious! Wrap it all up in a warm tortilla, complete with your favorite thirst quenching beverage and you will marvel about how great your yard looks.
Imagine. Mowing the grass and cooking supper all at the same time. Enjoy!

Author Bio
Capt’n Salsa provides an outstanding collection of free homemade salsa recipes at his web site, Great Salsa. Submit your favorite salsa recipe for publication at: http://www.great-salsa.com/submit_your_favorite_recipe.html

Article Source: http://www.ArticleGeek.com

Posted in Campfire Cooking | 2 Comments »

Dutch Oven Recipes: A Full Day of Dutch Oven

February 8th, 2015 by ironcooker

Dutch oven with feet

A Dutch oven is any in a family of thick-walled cooking pots, usually made in cast-iron.

They have tight-fitting lids and have been used to cook for hundreds of years.  While this article will talk about European and American historical applications, similar cooking pots were all developed by the Dutch, the Japanese and the Balkans.  Derivative cookware took hold in Britain, America, Australia, and South Africa.

The History of the Dutch oven

The proper Dutch oven has a long history of being a sturdy, utilitarian pot in Europe and through America.

Early European History

The similar cookware in the style of the Dutch oven was developed in the late 17th Century in both the Netherlands and Britain.  The Dutch used production and manufacturing methods that involved dry sand molds in which to pour metal.  The result was a smoother cooking surface that was more desirable than what the English could produce, and the pots were eventually imported into Britain to satisfy the demand.  Seeing an opportunity, Abraham Darby would later travel to the Netherlands to observe the manufacturing process.  Once he returned to Britain, he filed for a patent and produced the cookware for Britain and the American colonies.

American History

On the other side of the Atlantic, the design of the Dutch oven began to change in order to better suit the needs of the people.  A shallow pot, legs to hold the pot above coals became commonplace, and a flange on the lid allowed people to place hot coals on the top of the pot to evenly cook the contents without getting coal in the food.  Dutch ovens were beloved by colonists and settlers for their durability and versatility.  A single pot could be used for boiling, baking, stews, frying, roasting, and almost any other cooking application.  They became so desirable in fact that people of that time would include their favorite iron cookware in their will in order to ensure that it was bestowed to the desired inheritor.  It’s no surprise, then, that Dutch ovens were carried into the westward expansion by rugged pioneers like those in the Lewis and Clark expedition, mountain men, and cattle drivers.

Use in Cooking

Dutch ovens are versatile, utilitarian cookware, but they’re specially suited for long, slow cooking recipes.  Think roasts, stews, and casseroles.

In keeping with the pioneering spirit, Dutch ovens are great for camping and the outdoors.  Often, a Dutch oven made for camping will include features like tripod legs, wire bail handle, and a concaved lid to place hot coals on top for an even internal temperature.  You can even use one of these sturdy pots for true baking, producing great foods and sides like biscuits, cakes, breads, pizzas, and pies.  Using smaller insert baking pans, you can rotate out finished foods and keep baking or start on uncooked dishes.  Some models will allow for stacking to conserve heat, and may go as high as 5 or 6 pots atop one another.

Recipes

The Dutch oven was a valuable piece of equipment for its versatility.  If need be, one could literally cook every meal in one of these durable pots.  To demonstrate that point, five recipes to carry you throughout the day are included here.

dutch ovens

Supper

 

Resources

If you’re looking for more recipes, check out these great resources:

Dutch Oven Dude: The quintessential Dutch oven enthusiast, this site is full of recipes for your Dutch oven.  http://www.dutchovendude.com/dutch-oven-recipes.asp

The Blog at Iron Cooker: A great resource for Dutch oven recipes, outdoor life, cast-iron care, and a retailer for several types of Dutch oven.  http://www.ironcooker.com/blog/

Dutch Oven Mania: These people love Dutch ovens!  Find a number of great recipes, guides to clean and maintain your Dutch oven, and advice on what to look for in a Dutch oven.  http://www.dutchovenmania.com/dutch-oven-recipes.html

Seasoning and Care

Depending on how the Dutch oven is manufactured, you may need to keep in mind some tips for keeping your pot clean.

For Bare Cast-IronSize Matters Multiple Dutch Oven

Clean your bare cast-iron Dutch oven like you would any other cast-iron cookware: using a brush and boiling water.  It’s best to use very little or, preferably, no dish soap.  Once it’s dried, apply a thin layer of cooking oil to prevent rusting and store your Dutch oven in a clean, dry place.  Leave the lid ajar for air circulation so you can avoid the smell and taste of rancid oil.  You can also use a newspaper or dry paper towel to wick away any of the ambient moisture.

For Enameled Ovens

Enameled ovens don’t need to be seasoned before they’re used.  Remember that enameling is best suited for water-based heat, which means you should avoid deep-frying.  Clean it like you would you ordinary cookware—some brands can be put in the dishwater.

References

There are some really great photographers whose pictures were too great to pass up.  Thanks to these blogs for beautifying this lens.

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Dutch Oven Recipes: Black Forest Cobbler

February 1st, 2015 by ironcooker

Image1

The Black Forest Cake is something of a misnomer.  In its native german, the cake goes by the name of Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte, which literally translates to Black Forest cherry torte.  And you can see by the assembly that it is as much a cake as a Boston Cream Pie is a pie.

A Black Forest Cake is constructed by layering chocolate cake, whipped cream, and cherries on top of each other.  It’s capped at the top with another round of chocolate cake, and then the whole thing is dressed down with more whipped cream and often decorated with cherries and chocolate shavings on top.  Or, at least, that’s how it’s supposed to be done.

[Fun Fact: This cake gets its name not because the cake itself came out of Germany’s Black Forest, but because it is traditionally doused with a cherry liquor that hails from the region.]

What Makes a Black Forest Cake?

While this torte certainly has an involved and illustrious background, the most important part is what you get to eat.  This is a dessert that combines iconic flavors that westerners recognize in german desserts.

Chocolate is the foundation on which this cake is built.  The entire region gets credit for mastery of refining and bringing out the richness and depth of chocolate.  It should be no surprise that the swiss and the swedes have both also adopted their own versions of this cake.  The rich, chocolate foundation is built upon by a traditionally tart cherry flavor profile.  And while chocolate comes off as earthy and heady, the dull acidity of tart cherries provides a high note that plays against chocolate’s base flavors.  And of course, the whole thing is tied together with the creamy, sweet texture of ample amounts of whipped cream.

The problem is, a Black Cherry Cake is entirely too fragile to pack out to a campsite, and way too involved to make with the tools you have.  Or it is?

The Solution: Black Forest Cobbler

The Black Forest Cobbler is a great substitute when you’re craving the rich, engaging flavors of a Black Forest Cake but you’re nowhere near a kitchen. All of the ingredients are stable and can survive your trek, so there’s no reason not to treat yourself!

Ingredients

  • 1 Package of chocolate cake mix
  • 1 Can of cherry pie filling
  • 1 Can soda pop – cherry or lemon lime
  • 1 Hershey chocolate bar

Instructions

  1. Empty pie filling into a Non Stick 9 Inch Pie Pan.
  2. Sprinkle about 3/4 of cake mix on top in an even layer.
  3. Pour half of the can of soda on top of cake mix.  Aim for even distribution.
  4. Mix the soda into the cake mix, taking care not to disturb the pie filling underneath.
  5. Break  chocolate bar into small pieces, sprinkling on top.
  6. Put four small pebbles in a Cast Iron 4 Quart Round Dutch Oven.  Place the pie tin on top of the pebbles.
  7. Cover your Dutch oven and set on a small circle of coals. Cover the lid with coals.
  8. Cook at about 350 degrees for 30-40 minutes, or until the cake looks done when cut or poked.


And that’s a way to MacGyver a crumble worthy of the Black Forest Name even when you’re in the wilderness!!

Have you tried this recipe?  How did it work for you?  Tell us about it in the comments below!

You Might Also Like…

Thanks to Dutch Oven Dude for a great way to enjoy our favorite recipes, even outside of the kitchen!

Posted in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

The Do’s & Don’ts of Fly Fishing

February 1st, 2015 by ironcooker

Image1

Fishing is a popular sport for nature lovers who want to spend time outdoors.  Fly fishing is a very popular type of fishing, but the technique might be a little intimidating for newcomers.  It’s not the easiest way to fish, but it’s rewarding and gives you a sense of accomplishment.  What should you know when you’re ready to try out fly fishing?

Be Aware and Blend In

snakerollThe hardest part of fishing might be staying aware of your surroundings.  You might feel that fish are a lot easier to catch than larger game like birds or deer.  Don’t be fooled!  Fish can see you, and they’re excellent at detecting vibrations.  That includes your boots splashing around as you enter the water.  Fish swim away from noise, so be careful what you step on!  Making a rock tumble through the water could make all the fish go swimming away from you.

Although it’s fun to spend time with friends, it might be better to go fishing by yourself, or with someone who is very quiet.  Keep your conversation to a minimum–remember, the fish can even sense the vibrations of your chatting!

When you see a fish swimming near you, try to stay behind it.  Just like staying downwind of animals that you are hunting, hiding from the fish will improve your chances of catching it.

The Art of Casting

When casting, you want to make it really easy for the fish to find your lure.  When you’re casting, stay as still as possible.  Casting is one of the most important skills for fly fishing, so get lots of practice– you don’t even have to be on the water!  Set up a target on a wall or flat surface in your backyard, and try to hit the target with your lure as much as you can.

Find And Use Fly Fishing Resources

Even though the best way to learn something is to do it, you can get helpful tips and tricks from many different resources.  Check out websites, blogs, and magazines on fly fishing.  If you find a magazine that’s really helpful, set up a subscription.  Joining a fishing club is another great way to get experience.  You’ll be able to talk with others who have similar interests, and you might get some unique tips from expert fishermen.

Choosing the Right Lure

It’s important to choose the right lure, and to use a quality lure that looks real.  If the fish thinks it’s real, it’ll go for it!  Remember, when you’re fly fishing, you won’t always use the same lure.  You need to change your lure depending on the type of fish you’re trying to catch, the time of year, and where you’re fishing.fishing-30

Fly fishing might take some time to get good at, but when you gain experience, you’ll have a great time being out in nature.  If you’re just starting, don’t get discouraged.  Ask other fishermen for their tips, and use all of the fishing resources you can find.  If you’re just starting out with fly fishing, are you having the same problems every time you go out?  If you’ve fished before, what are some tips or tricks that made fishing easier for you?  Leave a comment in the section below!

Posted in Hunting & Fishing Life | No Comments »

Guide to buying a boat

Saturday February 28th, 2015 in Hunting & Fishing Life | 1 Comment »

Grill Roasted Yard Bird

Friday February 13th, 2015 in Campfire Cooking | 2 Comments »

Dutch Oven Recipes: A Full Day of Dutch Oven

Sunday February 8th, 2015 in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

Dutch Oven Recipes: Black Forest Cobbler

Sunday February 1st, 2015 in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

The Do’s & Don’ts of Fly Fishing

Sunday February 1st, 2015 in Hunting & Fishing Life | No Comments »

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