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Archive for the ‘Dutch Oven Recipes’ Category

Dutch Oven Recipes: A Full Day of Dutch Oven

February 8th, 2015 by ironcooker

Dutch oven with feet

A Dutch oven is any in a family of thick-walled cooking pots, usually made in cast-iron.

They have tight-fitting lids and have been used to cook for hundreds of years.  While this article will talk about European and American historical applications, similar cooking pots were all developed by the Dutch, the Japanese and the Balkans.  Derivative cookware took hold in Britain, America, Australia, and South Africa.

The History of the Dutch oven

The proper Dutch oven has a long history of being a sturdy, utilitarian pot in Europe and through America.

Early European History

The similar cookware in the style of the Dutch oven was developed in the late 17th Century in both the Netherlands and Britain.  The Dutch used production and manufacturing methods that involved dry sand molds in which to pour metal.  The result was a smoother cooking surface that was more desirable than what the English could produce, and the pots were eventually imported into Britain to satisfy the demand.  Seeing an opportunity, Abraham Darby would later travel to the Netherlands to observe the manufacturing process.  Once he returned to Britain, he filed for a patent and produced the cookware for Britain and the American colonies.

American History

On the other side of the Atlantic, the design of the Dutch oven began to change in order to better suit the needs of the people.  A shallow pot, legs to hold the pot above coals became commonplace, and a flange on the lid allowed people to place hot coals on the top of the pot to evenly cook the contents without getting coal in the food.  Dutch ovens were beloved by colonists and settlers for their durability and versatility.  A single pot could be used for boiling, baking, stews, frying, roasting, and almost any other cooking application.  They became so desirable in fact that people of that time would include their favorite iron cookware in their will in order to ensure that it was bestowed to the desired inheritor.  It’s no surprise, then, that Dutch ovens were carried into the westward expansion by rugged pioneers like those in the Lewis and Clark expedition, mountain men, and cattle drivers.

Use in Cooking

Dutch ovens are versatile, utilitarian cookware, but they’re specially suited for long, slow cooking recipes.  Think roasts, stews, and casseroles.

In keeping with the pioneering spirit, Dutch ovens are great for camping and the outdoors.  Often, a Dutch oven made for camping will include features like tripod legs, wire bail handle, and a concaved lid to place hot coals on top for an even internal temperature.  You can even use one of these sturdy pots for true baking, producing great foods and sides like biscuits, cakes, breads, pizzas, and pies.  Using smaller insert baking pans, you can rotate out finished foods and keep baking or start on uncooked dishes.  Some models will allow for stacking to conserve heat, and may go as high as 5 or 6 pots atop one another.

Recipes

The Dutch oven was a valuable piece of equipment for its versatility.  If need be, one could literally cook every meal in one of these durable pots.  To demonstrate that point, five recipes to carry you throughout the day are included here.

dutch ovens

Supper

 

Resources

If you’re looking for more recipes, check out these great resources:

Dutch Oven Dude: The quintessential Dutch oven enthusiast, this site is full of recipes for your Dutch oven.  http://www.dutchovendude.com/dutch-oven-recipes.asp

The Blog at Iron Cooker: A great resource for Dutch oven recipes, outdoor life, cast-iron care, and a retailer for several types of Dutch oven.  http://www.ironcooker.com/blog/

Dutch Oven Mania: These people love Dutch ovens!  Find a number of great recipes, guides to clean and maintain your Dutch oven, and advice on what to look for in a Dutch oven.  http://www.dutchovenmania.com/dutch-oven-recipes.html

Seasoning and Care

Depending on how the Dutch oven is manufactured, you may need to keep in mind some tips for keeping your pot clean.

For Bare Cast-IronSize Matters Multiple Dutch Oven

Clean your bare cast-iron Dutch oven like you would any other cast-iron cookware: using a brush and boiling water.  It’s best to use very little or, preferably, no dish soap.  Once it’s dried, apply a thin layer of cooking oil to prevent rusting and store your Dutch oven in a clean, dry place.  Leave the lid ajar for air circulation so you can avoid the smell and taste of rancid oil.  You can also use a newspaper or dry paper towel to wick away any of the ambient moisture.

For Enameled Ovens

Enameled ovens don’t need to be seasoned before they’re used.  Remember that enameling is best suited for water-based heat, which means you should avoid deep-frying.  Clean it like you would you ordinary cookware—some brands can be put in the dishwater.

References

There are some really great photographers whose pictures were too great to pass up.  Thanks to these blogs for beautifying this lens.

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Dutch Oven Recipes: Black Forest Cobbler

February 1st, 2015 by ironcooker

Image1

The Black Forest Cake is something of a misnomer.  In its native german, the cake goes by the name of Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte, which literally translates to Black Forest cherry torte.  And you can see by the assembly that it is as much a cake as a Boston Cream Pie is a pie.

A Black Forest Cake is constructed by layering chocolate cake, whipped cream, and cherries on top of each other.  It’s capped at the top with another round of chocolate cake, and then the whole thing is dressed down with more whipped cream and often decorated with cherries and chocolate shavings on top.  Or, at least, that’s how it’s supposed to be done.

[Fun Fact: This cake gets its name not because the cake itself came out of Germany’s Black Forest, but because it is traditionally doused with a cherry liquor that hails from the region.]

What Makes a Black Forest Cake?

While this torte certainly has an involved and illustrious background, the most important part is what you get to eat.  This is a dessert that combines iconic flavors that westerners recognize in german desserts.

Chocolate is the foundation on which this cake is built.  The entire region gets credit for mastery of refining and bringing out the richness and depth of chocolate.  It should be no surprise that the swiss and the swedes have both also adopted their own versions of this cake.  The rich, chocolate foundation is built upon by a traditionally tart cherry flavor profile.  And while chocolate comes off as earthy and heady, the dull acidity of tart cherries provides a high note that plays against chocolate’s base flavors.  And of course, the whole thing is tied together with the creamy, sweet texture of ample amounts of whipped cream.

The problem is, a Black Cherry Cake is entirely too fragile to pack out to a campsite, and way too involved to make with the tools you have.  Or it is?

The Solution: Black Forest Cobbler

The Black Forest Cobbler is a great substitute when you’re craving the rich, engaging flavors of a Black Forest Cake but you’re nowhere near a kitchen. All of the ingredients are stable and can survive your trek, so there’s no reason not to treat yourself!

Ingredients

  • 1 Package of chocolate cake mix
  • 1 Can of cherry pie filling
  • 1 Can soda pop – cherry or lemon lime
  • 1 Hershey chocolate bar

Instructions

  1. Empty pie filling into a Non Stick 9 Inch Pie Pan.
  2. Sprinkle about 3/4 of cake mix on top in an even layer.
  3. Pour half of the can of soda on top of cake mix.  Aim for even distribution.
  4. Mix the soda into the cake mix, taking care not to disturb the pie filling underneath.
  5. Break  chocolate bar into small pieces, sprinkling on top.
  6. Put four small pebbles in a Cast Iron 4 Quart Round Dutch Oven.  Place the pie tin on top of the pebbles.
  7. Cover your Dutch oven and set on a small circle of coals. Cover the lid with coals.
  8. Cook at about 350 degrees for 30-40 minutes, or until the cake looks done when cut or poked.


And that’s a way to MacGyver a crumble worthy of the Black Forest Name even when you’re in the wilderness!!

Have you tried this recipe?  How did it work for you?  Tell us about it in the comments below!

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Thanks to Dutch Oven Dude for a great way to enjoy our favorite recipes, even outside of the kitchen!

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Green Beans With New Potatoes Recipe

December 24th, 2014 by ironcooker

One of our Favorite Dutch Oven recipe is made with new redskin potatoes
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3 pounds fresh green beans

1/4 pound salt pork, sliced
1/4 cup bacon grease
2 cups chicken broth, plus more if needed
2 to 3 teaspoons House Seasoning, recipe follows
12 small red potatoes
1 onion, cut into slivers
1/2 stick unsalted butter, sliced
Ground black pepper
Directions

Remove the ends from the beans. Snap the beans in 2 pieces, place into a colander, wash, and set aside to drain.

Meanwhile, in a large cast iron Dutch oven, lightly brown the salt pork in the bacon grease over medium heat, turning often, for approximately 10 minutes. Toss the green beans into the pot, stirring them with a wooden spoon to coat well with the pork fat. Add the broth and House Seasoning. Cook over medium-low heat, covered tightly, for approximately 30 minutes, or until the beans are half done.

While the beans are cooking, peel a center strip from each new potato with a potato peeler. At the end of 30 minutes, add the potatoes and onion to the beans; add 1/4 cup more broth, if needed. Cook, covered tightly, until the potatoes are tender, approximately 25 to 30 minutes, periodically checking the pot to make sure a small amount of liquid remains. When the potatoes are tender, tilt the lid slightly, off to the side of the pot, and continue to cook until the green beans are wilted, approximately 15 minutes. While cooking, add the butter and season with pepper.

House Seasoning:

1 cup salt

1/4 cup black pepper

1/4 cup garlic powder

Mix ingredients together and store in an airtight container for up to 6 months.

Recipe courtesy Paula Deen

 

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Lamb Stew

October 18th, 2014 by ironcooker

Dutch oven lamb stew

lamb-stewThis is a great way to cook lamb in your cast iron cookware at home or at your camping adventure.

2 1/2 pounds leg or shoulder of lamb
4 tablespoons oil
1 onion chopped
1 minced clove garlic
2 large carrots cut in chunks
2 potatoes cut in chunks
4 cups lamb stock or water
1 small can tomato puree
1 tablespoon dry cooking sherry
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon kelp powder
2 – 4 tablespoons corn starch (optional)
1/2 cup cold water (optional)
2 tablespoons chopped parsley

Cut meat in 1 inch cubes , trimming off excess fat2DSC_0261

In 5 or 6 quart cast iron Dutch oven lightly brown lamb on all sides
use minimum oil

Add onions and garlic & sautee briefly

Add carrots , potatoes, lamb stock or water, tomato puree, sherry and seasoning, cover and bring to a boil then turn down heat and simmer 45 minutes.11

If you are using a campfire and tripod, lift your chain so it is away from the coals and not boiling.

Check and correct seasonings to taste.
thicken with cornstarch dissolved in water if desired.
garnish with chopped parsley and serve.

 

 

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Brazilian Pot Roast

October 5th, 2014 by ironcooker

Pot roast

Brazilian Pot Roast

Preheat oven to 325 F

1 beef roast  - 3 or 4 pounds
1 clove garlic minced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons oil
1 onion
1 carrot
1 bay leaf

imagesWith wide pronged fork, poke holes in roast over all surface

Combine garlic, salt, vinegar & water.
Pour over meat making sure marinade seeps into the hoels in meat. let stand for an hour.

Brown all surfaces of roast in oil in a cast iron Dutch oven over medium heat

Preheat oven to 325 F

add liquid and cook for 30 minutes.
Take out and add carrot,onion & bay leaf to the Dutch oven and turn down heat and simmer for 2
or 3 hours,  Until meat is tendersoy-braised-pot-roast

 

 

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Dutch Oven Roast Beef

April 19th, 2014 by ironcooker

Peggy’s Roast Beef

1 Boneless Rump Roast

1/2 cup 100% pure coconut oil

1 large onion cut up any you want.

4 to 6 cloves of garlic peeled but not chopped

Place all of the above ingredients in a cast iron Dutch oven over low heat.Put the lid in place and let it cook turning only every so often to keep one spot from getting too brown. I cooked mine about five hours turning it Cast iron Roast Beef Recipe occasionally.Remove the roast from the drippings which should be nice and brown by now.Place it on a plate. Add a little water to the drippings to make enough gravy. Turn the temperature up till the drippings begin to simmer.Mix cornstarch with water and use as a thickener. Add the slurry very slowly stirring constantly to prevent it from lumping. When the gravy is the right consistency you will know. Slice your roast across the grain and slip it back into the gravy.

I never season beef before I cook it unless I am stuffing it with garlic or peppers. As far as salt and pepper, I only season after the cooking is done and after the gravy is mixed. I only use salt and pepper to season my roast, but again, I only season just before we eat and after it is completely cooked.

Serve with mashed potatoes or rice and a veggie.

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Dutch Oven Recipes: A Full Day of Dutch Oven

Sunday February 8th, 2015 in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

Dutch Oven Recipes: Black Forest Cobbler

Sunday February 1st, 2015 in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

Green Beans With New Potatoes Recipe

Wednesday December 24th, 2014 in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

Lamb Stew

Saturday October 18th, 2014 in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

Brazilian Pot Roast

Sunday October 5th, 2014 in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

Dutch Oven Roast Beef

Saturday April 19th, 2014 in Dutch Oven Recipes | No Comments »

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